Desert Sculpture Park, Mitzpe Ramon, Itzu Rimer, View Trap
Desert Sculpture Park, Mitzpe Ramon, Itzu Rimer, View Trap
Desert Sculpture Park, Mitzpe Ramon, Itzu Rimer, View Trap
Desert Sculpture Park, Mitzpe Ramon, Itzu Rimer, View Trap
Desert Sculpture Park, Mitzpe Ramon, Itzu Rimer, View Trap
Desert Sculpture Park, Mitzpe Ramon, Itzu Rimer, View Trap
Desert Sculpture Park, Mitzpe Ramon, Itzu Rimer, View Trap
Desert Sculpture Park, Mitzpe Ramon, Itzu Rimer, View Trap
Desert Sculpture Park, Mitzpe Ramon, Itzu Rimer, View Trap
Desert Sculpture Park, Mitzpe Ramon, Itzu Rimer, View Trap

Kites


Itzu Rimmer

Artist
Itzu Rimmer
Origin
Israel
Year
1986
Material
Dolomite

About the artist

Itzu Rimmer was born in Israel in 1948.

He began art studies in London but cut them short to return to Israel to enlist in the army for the 1973 War. On completing his studies at the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in 1976 he moved to Be’er Sheva and taught at the College for Visual Arts, at Kay Educational College and at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev.

In 1980 he moved to Tel Aviv and taught at the Avni Institute for Art and at Bezalel in Jerusalem.

Rimmer’s main theme in his paintings and sculpture is exploring the rituals and myths of Israel throughout time.

Rimmer uses ancient ritual objects in his art works including mythical icons and symbols from rock paintings, ancient ritual sites and other relics from ancient desert cultures.

By using these motifs, Rimmer poetically explores the roots of the relationship of the new Israeli to his land, making use of the country’s varied landscapes, especially those in the desert, of its colors and ever-changing textures.

Rimmer has had many solo exhibitions and has participated in numerous group exhibitions in Israel and worldwide. Among other works, he created ”The Altar of Sodom” at Mount Sodom symposium (1984), and’ “Battle” at the Nitzana Terminal Event (1985).

He represented Israel at the International Biennale for Modern Art in Dubrovnik, Croatia (1997), won the first prize at the National Biennale for Young Artists (1977) and won the Sharet Foundation Grant for Young Artists (1978).

Today Itzu Rimmer lives and works in his studio in Mitzpe Ramon.

Rimmer Artist ENG

About the sculpture

On a wide strait winding down to the crater’s rim, Itzu Rimmer placed two rows of upright stones, which curve down with the winding path until they stop at a short distance from the cliff edge. At the end of the curve, before the drop into the abyss, the visitor’s path is blocked by one upright stone.

The sculpture “Kites” in Mitzpe Ramon is based on what researchers call “Desert Kites”. These were prehistoric hunting traps; made of two rows of stones, blocked at one end, which hunters would herd the animals in to so they cannot escape. Some of these traps were actually found in the Negev, in the Sinai desert, and in the deserts of Jordan.

“I cannot ignore the sharp transition between the high viewpoint into the depths of the crater. The sculpture makes the visitor feel that something terrible is about to happen, although he isn’t able to turn back.” says the artist, whose work directs the visitor to the sublime view which awaits him at the edge of the sculpture.

Rimmer work ENG

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