Desert Sculpture Park, Mitzpe Ramon, Saul Salo, Home
Desert Sculpture Park, Mitzpe Ramon, Saul Salo, Home
Desert Sculpture Park, Mitzpe Ramon, Saul Salo, Home
Desert Sculpture Park, Mitzpe Ramon, Saul Salo, Home
Desert Sculpture Park, Mitzpe Ramon, Saul Salo, Home
Desert Sculpture Park, Mitzpe Ramon, Saul Salo, Home
Desert Sculpture Park, Mitzpe Ramon, Saul Salo, Home
Desert Sculpture Park, Mitzpe Ramon, Saul Salo, Home

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Shaul Salo

Artist
Shaul Salo
Origin
Israel
Year
1988
Material
Dolomite

About the artist

Shaul Salo was born in Mexico in 1947.

He completed his studies in architecture at the National University of Mexico in 1971. In 1974 he immigrated to Israel and settled in Kibbutz Ein Gev. Between 1977-1983 he studied photography, ceramics and stone sculpture at the Jordan Valley Regional College and at Tel Hai Academic College.

Salo’s work was influenced by South American artists like Frida
Kahlo and Diego Rivera and Israeli artists such as Nahum Gutman and Reuven Rubin. This duality of sources of inspiration creates a unique interpretation of shapes and colors in his art, by using a combination of colorful ceramics in his sculptures.

Salo’s sculptural language also draws on architecture and is reflected in the sculpted structures he creates with concrete and basalt.

Nowadays Salo teaches sculpture at the Jordan Valley Regional College and at a branch of the University of Haifa in Tel Hai. His works are displayed in many places and have been purchased for private collections in Israel and abroad.

Shaul Salo lives and works in Kibbutz Ein Gev.

Salo Artist ENG

About the sculpture

On a hill overlooking the plateau that leads to the crater, Shaul Salo created a structure of huge stones that form a closed space.

Shaul called his work “Home” and it does in fact look like a structure intended to be used as a shelter.

“I wanted to create a space protected from the heat and wind, especially in such a barren place,” said Shaul.

The building has two entrances and a window overlooking the crater and follows the outline of the ridge, and is used as a shelter for the extreme weather conditions that characterize the region.

Shaul’s choice to draw attention to the uncompromising desert climate, which is difficult to live in it, questions the slogan “making the desert bloom”, not by making a political statement but rather by asking one to revisit the famous Zionist motto.

Salo work ENG

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